Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans)
Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans)

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Common Name(s): Mountain Ash, Victorian Ash

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus regnans

Distribution: Southeastern Australia, also grown on plantations

Tree Size: 230-330 ft (70-100 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 42 lbs/ft3 (680 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .49, .68

Janka Hardness: 1,210 lbf (5,400 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 14,010 lbf/in2 (96.7 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 2,033,000 lbf/in2 (14.02 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 8,530 lbf/in2 (58.8 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 6.5%, Tangential: 13.0%, Volumetric: 19.6%, T/R Ratio: 2.0

Color/Appearance: Heartwood tends to be a medium yellow to light brown. Sapwood slightly slighter than heartwood, but not clearly demarcated. Gum and mineral veins and streaks are common in the heartwood.

Grain/Texture: Grain is straight, with a medium to coarse texture.

Rot Resistance: Rated as very durable regarding decay resistance, with moderate insect resistance.

Workability: Overall easy to work with hand and machine tools. Glues, turns, and finishes well.

Odor: No characteristic odor.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Mountain Ash has been reported to cause eye, skin, and respiratory irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Not commonly imported to the United States, Mountain Ash is more widely used and available in Australia and New Zealand. Turned blocks and burls are sometimes available in the United States, with prices in the mid range for an imported species.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. However, though Mountain Ash as a species is not threatened, there’s controversy surrounding its harvesting in Australia because its forests provide habitat for other birds and mammals, some of which are endangered or threatened.

Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, boatbuilding, general construction/utility wood, flooring, and turned objects.

Comments: Among the most massive of trees in the entire world, Mountain Ash specimens hold ranks in the top ten largest trees for total height, girth, and total volume.

Mountain Ash is not a true ash (Fraxinus genus) but is instead in the unrelated Eucalyptus genus.

Related Species:

Related Articles:

None available.

Scans/Pictures: A special thanks to Steve Earis for providing the wood sample (veneer) of this wood species.

Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans)
Mountain Ash (sanded)
Mountain Ash (sealed)
Mountain Ash (sealed)
Mountain Ash (burl)
Mountain Ash (burl)
 

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rob snmithJames KidmanMark Dakins Recent comment authors
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rob snmith
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rob snmith

Yes, like America and most other ‘settled by European colonisation’ counties, many places and things in Australia are named after places and things from ‘back home’. We have pine trees that aren’t pines, mahoganies that aren’t mahoganies and so on. (Magpies, that while corvids, aren’t the same as European Magpies. But they are black and white.) Similar looking things, often got named after things from the home country.

James Kidman
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Europeans came to Australia and named things. Don’t get upset about common names, they don’t mean much. We also call this species Tasmanian Oak – hope this helps ;)

Mark Dakins
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Mark Dakins

I am very confused by this entry. To me “mountain ash” ARE Rowan but are not “Eucalyptus”, they are “Sorbus” of the family “Rosaceae” and have been for hundreds if not thousands of years. How did an Australian tree supplant names that have been in use in Europe going back at least to the ancient Celts?