Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris)

Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris)

View More Images Below

Common Name(s): Turkey Oak, Turkish Oak

Scientific Name: Quercus cerris

Distribution: Europe and Asia Minor

Tree Size: 80-120 ft (25-37 m) tall, 4-6 ft (1.2-2.0 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 45 lbs/ft3 (720 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .54, .72

Janka Hardness: 1,200 lbf (5,340 N)*

*Estimated hardness based on specific gravity

Modulus of Rupture: 16,570 lbf/in2 (114.3 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 1,568,000 lbf/in2 (10.81 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 8,170 lbf/in2 (56.4 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 6.0%, Tangential: 10.0%, Volumetric: 16.0%, T/R Ratio: ~1.7

Color/Appearance: Has a light to medium reddish-brown color.

Grain/Texture: Has medium-to-large pores and a fairly coarse grain.

Rot Resistance: Falls somewhere between durable and moderately durable.

Workability: Turkey Oak is said to work similarly to oaks found in the United States.

Odor: No data available.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, oak has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation, as well as asthma-like symptoms. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: No data available.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: No data available.

Comments: Turkey Oak does not belong to either the White or Red Oak groups, but is divided into a separate group which also includes Cork Oak (Quercus suber), the primary oak species used for cork bottle stoppers.

Related Species:

Related Articles:

Scans/Pictures: 

Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris)

Turkey Oak (sanded)

Turkey Oak (sealed)

Turkey Oak (sealed)

Turkey Oak (endgrain 10x)

Turkey Oak (endgrain 10x)

 
  • don lawson

    I have dealt with this timber for many years and am surprised by the lack of information and the misinformation. Commonly known amongst round timber merchants as gun barrel oak because of the unusually straight long clear stem which is common and has fooled many new buyers into paying high prices for what they thought was a veneer quality log. Introduced to Britain from Turkey. The sawmiller knows it as beer barrel oak becuase the only known uses were beer barrels which are the lowest grade of barrel, and railway keys[the wooden block which used to be between the rail and the fishplate]. Extremely bitter smell when fresh sawn, shakes when drying, extremely unstable in large sections and very undurable in contact with damp. I have seen a fence post rot off in seven years.

  • ?????? ??????????

    It has a very small hartwood compared to sapwood. It is very unstable and not very durable when it comes to elements. It splits easily. Here in Serbia, it is used solely as firewood.