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Common Name(s): African Juniper

Scientific Name: Juniperus procera

Distribution: East Africa

Tree Size: 100-120 ft (30-37 m) tall, 4-5 ft (1.2-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 34 lbs/ft3 (535 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .44, .54

Janka Hardness: 890 lbf (3,960 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 11,660 lbf/in2 (80.4 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 1,463,000 lbf/in2 (10.09 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 7,160 lbf/in2 (49.4 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 3.3%, Tangential: 5.0%, Volumetric: 8.3%, T/R Ratio: 1.5

Color/Appearance: No data available.

Grain/Texture: No data available.

Rot Resistance: No data available.

Workability: No data available.

Odor: Has a pleasant, cedar-like scent.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although there have been no adverse health effects specifically reported for African Juniper, several other species within the Juniperus genus have been reported to cause skin and/or respiratory irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: No data available.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is reported by the IUCN as being near threatened. Technically it doesn’t meet the Red List criteria of a vulnerable or endangered species, but is close to qualifying and/or may qualify in the near future.

Common Uses: No data available.

Comments: No data available.

Related Species:

Scans/Pictures: There are currently no pictures of this woods species available for viewing. If you’d like to contribute wood samples to be scanned, (even small pieces of veneer can be sent), please use the contact form.

  • Rufus

    Sir:
    I am from the southern part of the state of Alabama. I have since moved away but have family there. My uncle loves the outdoors and recently sent me a piece of wood for a walking stick handle. He has little formal education and cannot spell it for me, but he pronounces it Marthorn. He said during his time, folks would use this wood as fence posts, and the claim is that it will last a hundred years. It is so hard that you can barely drive a staple in it. I only have this piece and I have not seen the tree. Any idea what the name of it is?