The wood name Philippine Mahogany is a loose term that applies to a number of wood species coming from southeast Asia. Another common name for this wood is Meranti: while yet another name that is commonly used when referring to plywood made of this type of wood is Lauan. (And even though it’s called Philippine Mahogany, it bears no relation to what is considered to be “true” mahogany in the Swietenia and Khaya genera—see the article Mahogany Mixups: the Lowdown for more information.)

Scientifically, the name Philippine Mahogany has been used to encompass most commercial lumber found in the Shorea genus, where it is very commonly used in it’s native southeast Asia. There is an abundance of variety between the difference species: each with different working properties, appearances, and mechanical strength values.

The five main groupings for Philippine Mahogany (Meranti/Lauan) are: Light Red Meranti, Dark Red Meranti, White Meranti, Yellow Meranti, and Balau.


Light Red Meranti (Shorea spp.)

Light Red Meranti


Dark Red Meranti (Shorea spp.)

Dark Red Meranti


No Images Available

Yellow Meranti


White Meranti (Shorea spp.)

White Meranti


No Images Available

Balau

 

23 Comments

  1. Bryan Perez December 8, 2018 at 2:25 am - Reply

    Is this type of wood resistant to termites/pests fungi?

  2. Tessie January 26, 2018 at 10:07 am - Reply

    What is the best wood for a house door, need assistance.
    Thank you.

  3. Clint Lefcourt May 27, 2017 at 3:36 pm - Reply
  4. Sefton Payne August 30, 2015 at 4:33 pm - Reply

    Would this kind of wood be good for protecting a valuable antique snooker cue? If not what kind of wood be best??
    Cheers
    Sefton.

    • William Hope September 6, 2015 at 6:05 am - Reply

      I’m assuming you are asking about a carrying case. The case construction would be more important than the wood. That said, this wood is soft, like pine, so it would be susceptible to dents and dings. I’d recommend a hardwood with metal corner protectors.

      • Bloughmee February 2, 2017 at 11:14 pm - Reply

        Mahogany is much harder than pine and mahogany is absolutely nothing like pine. Pine is about as soft a softwood as it gets, save for something like balsa. Mahogany machines well with very little grain tear-out – it would work great for any kind of protective case/box.

        • Dave Livesay September 20, 2017 at 7:35 pm - Reply

          Phillipine mahogany is not real mahogany. It’s Shorea, a southeast Asian Dipterocarp genus. Mahogany comes from several species of Swietenia, native to the Americas. As far as hardness, it’s probably comparable to mahogany, but talk about machining poorly. Shorea is the worst. There are so many species of Shorea, Swietenia and Pinus as to make any generalizations about hardness impossible. The pine you’re familiar with–the stuff you buy at the big box stores–is pretty soft, but red pine is as hard as hornbeam.

          • ?214 December 8, 2017 at 1:38 am

            Additionally, periphery mahoganies like sipo and sapele can be quite hard compared to relatively soft genuine mahogany. On the other end of the scale you have spanish cedar (another relative of mahogany) which is softer than many softwoods. You are correct that wild generalizations cannot be made.

  5. Jennah Barnes March 15, 2015 at 10:07 pm - Reply

    Looking to buy new outdoor tables at https://philippinefurniturestore.com/. Is mahogany a good material?

  6. vdc December 14, 2013 at 3:12 pm - Reply

    how high are the mahogany trees?

    • Dean Seaman February 9, 2015 at 1:26 am - Reply

      Its NOT Mahogany!

      • Pony Boy August 29, 2015 at 9:54 am - Reply

        what IS it!??

        • Dean Seaman August 29, 2015 at 11:11 am - Reply

          Well, the wood name Philippine Mahogany is a loose term that applies to a number of wood species coming from southeast Asia. Another common name for this wood is Meranti: while yet another name that is commonly used when referring to plywood made of this type of wood is Lauan. (And even though it’s called Philippine Mahogany, it bears no relation to what is considered to be “true” mahogany in the Swietenia and Khaya genera—see the article Mahogany Mixups: the Lowdown for more information.)
          Scientifically, the name Philippine Mahogany has been used to encompass most commercial lumber found in the Shorea genus, where it is very commonly used in it’s native southeast Asia. There is an abundance of variety between the difference species: each with different working properties, appearances, and mechanical strength values.
          The five main groupings for Philippine Mahogany (Meranti/Lauan) are: Light Red Meranti, Dark Red Meranti, White Meranti, Yellow Meranti, and Balau.
          I hope that answers your question, Pony Boy.

          • Pony Boy September 7, 2015 at 8:02 pm

            um… from one perspective yes, but….. you didnt answer what is MAHOGANY (ie, where can we find it), since philippine mahogany isnt lol

          • Dean Seaman September 7, 2015 at 11:40 pm

            Sorry, it appeared you were asking what Phillipine Mahogany was.

            As for real Mahogany, this Wiki article does a good job explaining what Mahogany is – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahogany

          • ejmeier September 8, 2015 at 3:29 pm
          • Pony Boy September 9, 2015 at 3:31 am

            i know what it is, thanks, but if youre going to say Phillipine isnt real mahogany, you gotta back it up ;)

          • Dean Seaman September 17, 2015 at 8:50 pm

            “Back it up”?….really? Do you know where you’re at?
            Why don’t read the article these comments are attached to, if you don’t believe me.

          • Pony Boy September 24, 2015 at 7:08 am

            I bought Swietenia… is THAT “real” mahogany? or whats the highest quality, rarest, most expensive breed in the world? and can it grow in FL, or only in the Rain Forest?

          • Dean Seaman September 25, 2015 at 11:51 pm

            The answer to your question and any other wood related question you can think of is contained within this website.

          • Pony Boy September 26, 2015 at 5:00 am

            yes, within this website, including the threads

          • Danny O'Donnell December 12, 2015 at 3:25 pm

            Nice bit of blatant plagiarism.

          • Dean Seaman December 12, 2015 at 5:01 pm

            That was part of the point…and he still didn’t get it. Clueless.

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