Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata)

Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata)

View More Images Below

Common Name(s): Jarrah

Scientific Name: Eucalyptus marginata

Distribution: Australia

Tree Size: 130 ft (40 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 52 lbs/ft3 (835 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .66, .84

Janka Hardness: 1,860 lbf (8,270 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 15,650 lbf/in2 (108.0 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 2,132,000 lbf/in2 (14.70 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 9,600 lbf/in2 (66.2 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 6.3%, Tangential: 9.4%, Volumetric: 16.4%, T/R Ratio: 1.5

Color/Appearance: Heartwood color ranges from a light red or brown to a darker brick red; tends to darken with exposure to light. Thin sapwood is a pale yellow to pink.

Grain/Texture: Grain tends to be interlocked or wavy with a medium to coarse texture. Some boards can contain gum pockets or streaks as a naturally-occurring defect. Jarrah can also exhibit a curly figure.

Endgrain: Diffuse-porous; medium pores arranged in diagonal rows; exclusively solitary; tyloses common; growth rings indistinct; rays not visible without lens; parenchyma vasicentric.

Rot Resistance: Jarrah is rated as very durable regarding decay resistance, and it is also quite resistant to insect attack.

Workability: Jarrah tends to be difficult to machine on account of its high density and interlocked grain. Jarrah also has a moderate blunting effect on cutting edges. Jarrah turns, glues, and finishes well.

Odor: No characteristic odor.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Jarrah has been reported to cause eye and/or respiratory irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Jarrah is a widely distributed timber throughout southwest Australia, and prices for local lumber should be moderate. Prices for imported Jarrah tends to be in the mid range for exotic lumber. Curly pieces, or burl block are likely to be much more expensive.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Flooring, heavy construction, veneer, cabinetry, outdoor furniture, and turned objects.

Comments: Because of its great durability and common occurrence, Jarrah is a useful timber for exterior projects in Australia. Its vibrant red color, and high density add to its marketability for use as a flooring material. Jarrah burl is also prized among wood turners, with its tight knots, swirling grain, and rich colors giving an aesthetically pleasing appearance.

Related Species:

Related Articles:

Scans/Pictures: A special thanks to Steve Earis for providing the wood sample and turned photo of this wood species.

Jarrah (sanded)

Jarrah (sanded)

Jarrah (sealed)

Jarrah (sealed)

Jarrah (endgrain)

Jarrah (endgrain)

Jarrah (endgrain 10x)

Jarrah (endgrain 10x)

Jarrah (turned)

Jarrah (turned)