Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)

Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)

View More Images Below

Common Name(s): Green Ash

Scientific Name: Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Distribution: Eastern and Central North America

Tree Size: 50-65 ft (15-20 m) tall, 1-2 ft (.3-.6 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 40 lbs/ft3 (640 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .53, .64

Janka Hardness: 1,200 lbf (5,340 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 14,100 lbf/in2 (97.2 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 1,660,000 lbf/in2 (11.40 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 7,080 lbf/in2 (48.8 MPa)

Shrinkage: Radial: 4.6%, Tangential: 7.1%, Volumetric: 12.5%, T/R Ratio: 1.5

Color/Appearance: The heartwood is a light brown color, though darker shades can also be seen, which is sometimes sold as Olive Ash.

Grain/Texture: Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes curly or figured boards can be found.

Rot Resistance: Heartwood is rated as perishable, or only slightly durable in regard to decay. Ash is also not resistant to insect attack.

Workability: Produces good results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Odor: Gives off a distinct, moderately unpleasant smell when being worked.

Allergies/Toxicity: Ash in the Fraxinus genus has been reported to cause skin irritation, and a decrease in lung function. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Ash is among the least expensive utility hardwoods available domestically; it should compare similarly to oak in terms of price.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.

Comments: Green Ash is one of a handful of species in the Fraxinus genus that are used as commercial lumber. It has strength/mechanical properties that are very close to the related White Ash (Fraxinus americana) and is frequently mixed and sold as “White Ash.”

Related Species:

Related Articles:

Scans/Pictures:

Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)

Green Ash (sanded)

Green Ash (sealed)

Green Ash (sealed)

Green Ash (endgrain)

Green Ash (endgrain)

Green Ash (endgrain 10x)

Green Ash (endgrain 10x)